National Poisons Information Service

A service commissioned by Public Health England

 

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Members of the public

seeking specific

information on poisons

should contact:

 

In England and Wales:

NHS 111 - dial 111

 

In Scotland:

NHS 24 - dial 111

 

In N Ireland:

Contact your local GP or

pharmacist during

normal hours; click here

(www.gpoutofhours

.hscni.net/) for GP

services Out-of-Hours.

 

In Republic of Ireland:

01 809 2166

 

Healthcare

professionals seeking

poisons information

should consult:

www.toxbase.org

2,4-dinitrophenol

Dinitrophenol is an industrial chemical sometimes purchased from dealers or via the internet and taken for weight reduction and ‘body sculpting’. While DNP can reduce body fat, the chemical is highly toxic and not safe for human consumption. DNP has been associated with a number of severe episodes of toxicity in the UK in recent years, including several deaths. For this reason, NPIS has been monitoring enquiries relating to DNP, publishing data in our annual reports and providing more frequent updates to Public Health England and the Food Standards Agency.

 

During 2016/17, the reductions in telephone enquiries and TOXBASE accesses relating to DNP observed in the previous year have been maintained. Compared to 2015/16, the numbers of separate patients involved in telephone enquiries about systemic DNP exposure fell from 35 to 14, while accesses to the TOXBASE entry on DNP fell from 356 to 120. 

 

While these reductions are encouraging, there continue to be occasional episodes of severe toxicity and NPIS is aware of two patients referred to the service during 2016/17 with DNP poisoning who subsequently died, increasing the total number of DNP-related deaths reported to the service to 13 since 2008 (Figure 1).

 

Figure 1. Telephone enquiries and TOXBASE accesses relating to DNP 2008-2017)

 


Information from the NPIS Annual Report 2016/17.

 

| Reserach we undertake | Antidotes | Button batteries | Carbon monoxide | Cyanide | 2,4-dinitrophenol | Drugs of misuse | Electronic cigarettes | Glycols and methanol |Household products | Iron poisoning | Lead exposure | NSAIDs | Oral anticoagulants | Pesticides | Snake bite |